UPennAlert Public Safety Notice  

Civil Unrest

Emergency215-573-3333

UPennAlert Public Safety Notice

Civil Unrest

At approximately 8:47 pm on Monday, October 26th, a large group of approximately 150 protestors gathered at 52nd & Locust Streets, and marched through West Philadelphia. At approximately 9:15 pm, approximately 50 individuals broke off from that group and marched to 40th and Chestnut Streets, breaking windows of businesses and vehicles in the area. The group then left the area, heading west on Walnut Street, out of the Penn Patrol Zone.

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Penn Police continue to monitor the activity in conjunction with Philadelphia Police. Penn Police and Allied have increased patrols in the area.

Update 9:56pm: All clear in the west side of the patrol zone. Police and security officers will continue to patrol the area.

Update: Last seen heading westbound on Walnut Street at 44th Street.

Update: Last seen heading westbound on Walnut Street at 41st Street.

Update: Last seen heading westbound on Walnut Street towards 40th Street.

Update: Last seen heading southbound on 39th at Walnut Street.

Civil unrest in the area of 4000 block of Sansom Street.  There are approximately 50 protestors last seen heading eastbound on Chestnut from 39th Street. Police responding, use caution, avoid area.

Additional police and security officers are in the area. For your safety, please ensure you lock your windows and doors.

The Division of Public Safety will continue to provide special checks throughout the Penn patrol zone, to register or learn more, visit: https://www.publicsafety.upenn.edu/contact/propertycheck/

Please be sure to use the Walking Escorts and Riding Escorts available to you free of charge.

Additionally, if you have not done so, please take a moment to sign up for the UPennAlert Emergency Notification System as well as the Penn Guardian System which can help Police better find your location in an emergency.

UPennAlert Registration: Visit: www.publicsafety.upenn.edu/upennalert for information on how to register.

Penn Guardian: Visit: https://www.publicsafety.upenn.edu/safety-initiatives/pennguardian/ for information on the PennGuardian system.

Contact Information: Emergencies: 215/573-3333 or 511 (from any campus phone)

Help Line: 215-898-HELP (4357)

Special Services: 215/898-6600

Escort Services: Walking 215/898-WALK (9255)

Penn Transit Ride Service 215/898-RIDE (7433)

General Information: 215/898-7297

  • Posted on October 26, 2020 at 9:25PM
  • Last updated

News and Events

Working Dog Center to open at South Bank on September 11, 2012

Featured in this week’s Penn Current, the Penn Vet Working Dog Center is launching a training site for working dogs.  This site will allow the group to have a physical space on campus for training detection dogs, who work with law enforcement, search and rescue, and other national security organizations.  We are proud to report that two of the dogs will be joining the the Penn Police department upon graduation.

Read the full article from the Penn Current:

Working Dog Center to open at South Bank this fall

 

Though the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks will be a time for somber reflection, the Penn Vet Working Dog Center is using the day to celebrate the opening of a new physical space—located in the South Bank, 3401 Grays Ferry Ave.—for training detection dogs.
The Sept. 11 ribbon-cutting date is particularly resonant for the Center, a nonprofit within Penn born from the study of search-and-rescue dogs that sought survivors in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. Officially formed in 2007, the organization has been without a physical home.
“The Working Dog Center has a research component, an education component, and what’s going to open on Sept. 11 is the training component,” says Sarah Griffith, the Center’s assistant director.
The new facility will offer a dedicated space for transforming young puppies into highly trained detection dogs that may go on to careers in search-and-rescue, bomb detection, or policing.
The Center is currently seeking foster families to care for the first class of eight-week-old puppies.
“The foster families will drop them off in the morning and pick them up in the evening,” says Griffith. “During the day there will be a full training curriculum.”
A professional handler will help train the dogs with the assistance of volunteers and interns, some of whom will be selected through partnerships between the Center and programs that assist at-risk youth, veterans, and parolees.
A lab puppy in training at the facility of one of the breeders likely provide puppies.
When the dogs “graduate” after a year of training, they will be sold to national security organizations such as military groups, local police departments, and the Transportation Security Administration.
Cynthia Otto, Center director and an associate professor at Penn Vet, says some of the dogs will remain members of the Penn community.
“Two of our best female dogs will become Penn Police dogs and stay on campus,” she says. 
The dogs’ progress will be carefully tracked to advance the Center’s research program. Ultimately, Otto hopes to identify specific genetic elements and training techniques that allow the Center to breed consistently energetic, disciplined, and successful working dogs.
The Center is holding an information session at noon on Friday, June 29, at Hill Pavilion 111 for those interested in becoming a foster family for the dogs.
For more information about fostering, volunteering, and donating to the Center, visit www.pennvetwdc.org or email Sarah Griffith at griff@vet.upenn.edu.
Originally published on June 28, 2012

Though the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks will be a time for somber reflection, the Penn Vet Working Dog Center is using the day to celebrate the opening of a new physical space—located in the South Bank, 3401 Grays Ferry Ave.—for training detection dogs.

The Sept. 11 ribbon-cutting date is particularly resonant for the Center, a nonprofit within Penn born from the study of search-and-rescue dogs that sought survivors in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. Officially formed in 2007, the organization has been without a physical home.

“The Working Dog Center has a research component, an education component, and what’s going to open on Sept. 11 is the training component,” says Sarah Griffith, the Center’s assistant director.

The new facility will offer a dedicated space for transforming young puppies into highly trained detection dogs that may go on to careers in search-and-rescue, bomb detection, or policing.

The Center is currently seeking foster families to care for the first class of eight-week-old puppies.

“The foster families will drop them off in the morning and pick them up in the evening,” says Griffith. “During the day there will be a full training curriculum.”

A professional handler will help train the dogs with the assistance of volunteers and interns, some of whom will be selected through partnerships between the Center and programs that assist at-risk youth, veterans, and parolees.

When the dogs “graduate” after a year of training, they will be sold to national security organizations such as military groups, local police departments, and the Transportation Security Administration.

Cynthia Otto, Center director and an associate professor at Penn Vet, says some of the dogs will remain members of the Penn community.

“Two of our best female dogs will become Penn Police dogs and stay on campus,” she says. 

The dogs’ progress will be carefully tracked to advance the Center’s research program. Ultimately, Otto hopes to identify specific genetic elements and training techniques that allow the Center to breed consistently energetic, disciplined, and successful working dogs.

The Center is holding an information session at noon on Friday, June 29, at Hill Pavilion 111 for those interested in becoming a foster family for the dogs.

For more information about fostering, volunteering, and donating to the Center, visit www.pennvetwdc.org or email Sarah Griffith at griff@vet.upenn.edu.

Originally published on June 28, 2012

 

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